Using the five senses of wine marketing

Nowadays people can buy anything they want, wherever and whenever they want. The market offers a huge range of choices, perhaps too many. The buying process is driven by many different factors, and marketing and communication are fundamental tools used in persuasion.

This is also true for the wine sector, where wineries are able to transmit oenologists’ work and passion to the final customer through marketing, communication and packaging. This kind of communication happens in two different moments and evokes all five senses.

iconfinder_10_2529923.pngThe first way in which the wineries transmit their message is the purchasing moment. A customer has to choose the wine bottle from a wide range of other competitors. The choice is driven firstly by sight, which is influenced by colours, shapes, writing, lights and shelf position. The customer is going to exclude “neutral” bottles and focus on the ones that capture their emotional interest. As many of us know, colours can stimulate emotions and these feelings can drive our purchasing process. Due to this, appealing colours and images on labels are strongly linked to sales.

iconfinder_hand-stop-o_1608369.png

The second sense of interacting with the customer is touch. Everyone purchasing a wine bottle is going to grab it from the shelf and feel it. At that moment the shape, the weight, the kind of paper used for the label and the reliefs, deliver a different sense of quality to the possible consumer.

The purchase is completed when the customer is satisfied with what they see and feel when they choose the bottle.

The second moment in which the wineries can use communication to distinguish themselves is in the opening and tasting of the wine. This is a ritual. A ritual in which all five senses play a part. A moment full of pathos.

icons8-hearing-52.pngThe hands have to open the bottle in an elegant way, cutting the plastic capsule and uncorking the bottle. The sounds can be different, powerful and louder for champagnes or quieter for still wines. Moreover, the customer can hear the magic gurgle of wine as it is poured from the bottle into the glass.

The glass of wine is able to show us an incredible spectrum of colours, these colours are the oenologists’ work. They are able to provide the right colour to their wine due to a knowledgeable use of grape skins during the winemaking process.

icons8-runny-nose-90.png

The sense of smell is divided into a glass of wine between emotional feeling and organoleptic perception. This ritual step brings memories and feelings to the mind because memories and feelings are linked emotionally to those perceptions arising from wine flavours.

icons8-drinking-240.png

Finally, taste. The sense that is the result of the soil and winery work, the one most strongly influenced by the other four. Wine taste delivers physically the winery’s message to the customers. Each step should be studied and developed by the winery team in order to give rise to those emotions coming from the customers’ taste experiences. 

Due to this personal reflection, I believe that winemakers and marketing and communication experts have several reasons to work together. If the wine is great, then marketing has an easier job. If communication is great too, winemakers are able to show their ability to final customers in the best way. Winemakers and marketers must not to be in competition, but they must be complementary.

Federico Dallari Bondanini

The five senses of wine marketing

Nowadays people can buy anything they want, wherever and whenever they want. The market offers a huge range of choices, perhaps too many. The buying process is driven by many different factors, and marketing and communication are fundamental tools used in persuasion.

This is also true for the wine sector, where wineries are able to transmit oenologists’ work and passion to the final customer through marketing, communication and packaging. This kind of communication happens in two different moments and evokes all five senses.

iconfinder_10_2529923.pngThe first way in which the wineries transmit their message is the purchasing moment. A customer has to choose the wine bottle from a wide range of other competitors. The choice is driven firstly by sight, which is influenced by colours, shapes, writing, lights and shelf position. The customer is going to exclude “neutral” bottles and focus on the ones that capture their emotional interest. As many of us know, colours can stimulate emotions and these feelings can drive our purchasing process. Due to this, appealing colours and images on labels are strongly linked to sales.

iconfinder_hand-stop-o_1608369.png

The second sense of interacting with the customer is touch. Everyone purchasing a wine bottle is going to grab it from the shelf and feel it. At that moment the shape, the weight, the kind of paper used for the label and the reliefs, deliver a different sense of quality to the possible consumer.

The purchase is completed when the customer is satisfied with what they see and feel when they choose the bottle.

The second moment in which the wineries can use communication to distinguish themselves is in the opening and tasting of the wine. This is a ritual. A ritual in which all five senses play a part. A moment full of pathos.

icons8-hearing-52.pngThe hands have to open the bottle in an elegant way, cutting the plastic capsule and uncorking the bottle. The sounds can be different, powerful and louder for champagnes or quieter for still wines. Moreover, the customer can hear the magic gurgle of wine as it is poured from the bottle into the glass.

The glass of wine is able to show us an incredible spectrum of colours, these colours are the oenologists’ work. They are able to provide the right colour to their wine due to a knowledgeable use of grape skins during the winemaking process.

icons8-runny-nose-90.png

The sense of smell is divided into a glass of wine between emotional feeling and organoleptic perception. This ritual step brings memories and feelings to the mind because memories and feelings are linked emotionally to those perceptions arising from wine flavours.

icons8-drinking-240.png

Finally, taste. The sense that is the result of the soil and winery work, the one most strongly influenced by the other four. Wine taste delivers physically the winery’s message to the customers. Each step should be studied and developed by the winery team in order to give rise to those emotions coming from the customers’ taste experiences. 

Due to this personal reflection, I believe that winemakers and marketing and communication experts have several reasons to work together. If the wine is great, then marketing has an easier job. If communication is great too, winemakers are able to show their ability to final customers in the best way. Winemakers and marketers must not to be in competition, but they must be complementary.

Federico Dallari Bondanini

The emotional similarities between experiencing art and wine

For the past 5,000 years, two trends strongly related to emotional feelings have survived and developed during human evolution. Art is the first one, the human creation that arouses emotions through the sense of sight. Wine is the second one, which plays in much the same way on the sense of taste. Both are able to release different feelings in the human body, depending on the kind of art or the wine taste.

Due to this ability, artists or oenologists are able to fill canvas or bottle with complexity, freshness, memories, thoughts, energy, harmony, colours, uniqueness or elegance, all elements that can capture the senses of users during their experience. Different cultural backgrounds and previous experience lead to different art and wine interpretations that changes from user to user. Art and wine can be seen as emotional journeys that are provided by artists and oenologists. So in my opinion, wine categories can be linked to artistic currents through emotions or ideas that arise from both.

pop artI found an ideological and emotional connection between Lambrusco and Pop Art, two currents ready to blow up in a of fresh, youthful and playful atmosphere. These kind of Bottles and Art become global due to the industrialization of the production processes. This is confirmed by Roy Lichtenstein himself when he said “Everybody has called Pop Art ‘American’ painting, but it’s actually industrial painting.” and by 60 million liters of Lambrusco produced in 2017 as reported by the Emilia tourism web site.

picasso

In my opinion, there is a match between the complexity of a Barolo wine tasting or a Pablo Picasso exhibition. The heavy structure underpinning the two “products” could be comparable in different ways. Barolo has a strong complexity and identity, and it is characterized by flavours that came out sip after sip. The complexity in this kind of wine is harmonious, something impossible to define through a single sip. In the same way as Barolo, Picasso’s paintings have to be observed carefully and several times in order to find the harmony that is present in his complex artworks.

monet

 

Freshness is another characteristic that art and wine have in common. The freshness evoked by a white wine like a Vermentino can be compared to the fresh and breezy feelings coming from an en plein air Monet painting. Smelling a glass of Vermentino or looking at “Femme à l’ombrelle tournée vers la gauche” reminds us of the sensation of fresh air that is breathed in a countryside breezy spring morning.

klimt

The golden sparkles and uniqueness of a Metodo Classico is comparable to Klimt’s “Portrait of Adele Bloch-Bauer.” In fact, the feeling of bubbles popping up in the mouth is very similar to the sensation created by the golden flow wrapping around Klimt’s lady in the portrait. In this case, artwork and wine are strongly linked to a luxurious and sparkling emotion.

I would like to invite you to jump into an amazing experience that will allow you to match your emotions with art and wine according to your feelings. Eternal beautiful art and wine, together, created a never ending bond that won’t disappear.

 Federico Dallari Bondanini

 

References

1 https://artattack911.com/roy-lichtenstein-pop-art-great-first-friday-art-classes-art-studio/

2 http://www.artslife.com/2018/02/28/boccioni-record-sothebys-impressionisti-moderni-londra-febbraio-2018-risultati/

3 https://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saggio_di_figura_en_plein_air

4 https://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ritratto_di_Adele_Bloch-Bauer_Ihttps://www.milanoplatinum.com/spumante-champagne-feste.html

5 https://www.giornalecittadinopress.it/gustav-klimt-tra-simbolo-e-archetipo-seconda-edizione-della-mostra-ispirata-allartista-viennese/