When fashion is becoming “democratic”

During one of his rare interviews, Zara owner Amancio Ortega has always remarked that his brand strength consists in having quick reactions to consumers’ demands, and no advertising.  Well, maybe  it would have been “Better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to speak out and remove all doubt” also this time.

Let’s go back to last week: the Irish radio speaker Muireann O’Connell posted on her Twitter account last Zara campaign picture with a vitriolic comment – “You have got to be sh**ting me, Zara”. Actually, according to her absolutely Irish red hair and not properly skinny body, it seemed to be so: the leader of the Inditex Group was making fun of her and the majority of us. In fact, where the slogan says “Love your curves,” the models wearing Zara curvy jeans are fitting a size 36.

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Zara jeans campaign – Credits: Twitter

There’s something weird, it’s true. However, thanks to O’Connell’s tweet, a still unknown photo has become viral through social networks – the best place to share criticism and indignation in 21st century. Moving from the ironic “Love curves? Which curves?” to more fervent philippics about anorexia and a bad example for young generations, on the other hand a crowd of suspicions has alluded to a voluntarily ambiguous marketing and communication strategy. You know, there is only one thing in the world worse than being talked about, and that is not being talked about at all.

Whatever the hidden goal, the controversial advertising seemed not to have paid attention to what’s going on in the real fashion world. First the consecration of Victoria’s Secret Angels with their healthy, sexy and feminine silhouettes, then a star named Gigi Hadid has born even if she is a 86-64-89 model. Finally, the giant of fashion editorial industry, Vogue US, celebrates women overcoming the ancient prejudice based on the correlation “skeletons – models”.  The March 2017 cover story is an hymn to beauty and its revolution: starring current fashion and social icons such as above-mentioned Gigi, plus Ashley Graham, Kendall Jenner and the Italian Vittoria Ceretti, what stands out is the motto “No norm is the new norm”.  A trend that Dolce e Gabbana had already caught in their early runways and relaunched during the last Milan Women Fashion Week, when one hundred fifty men and women of every ethnic group, height and size run the catwalk under the hashtag #realpeople.

It looked like stone age, but it was only in 2012 that Dior excluded Jourdan Dunn from the fashion week because of her generous breasts. It’s time for real women to get their revenge.

Back to the last week’s episode, maybe Mr. Ortega and his marketing consultants should take a walk to one of  Zara’s shops in Italy. They would be amazed by the amount of S and XS sizes still on sale.

Alessandra Petagna

Cover ImageVogue Magazine

Sources:

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