WELCOME

Luxury goods, fashion and lifestyle represent one of the most important areas of Italian excellence.
Our International Master in Luxury Management provides students with knowledge and capabilities required by the major brands in the luxury industry. Continue reading “WELCOME”

Life is brewtiful: The rise of the Coffee Connoisseur

Standing at the bar in an Italian coffee shop in Milan, I overhear two women to my left discussing the superior quality of Italian espresso over the classical filter coffee they are used to at home. They are tourists and clearly very taken with the Italian coffee culture. They are describing the coffee as being “rich,” “full-bodied” with “hints of caramel.” We have become accustomed in recent years to describing coffee much the same way we would a glass of wine. We use the language of oenology, talking about the aroma, the body, even the colour. We carefully choose between different roasts, different kinds if beans and indulgently sip our lavishly brewed and carefully chosen cup of coffee instead of downing it in one gulp.

Continue reading “Life is brewtiful: The rise of the Coffee Connoisseur”

Here are Singapore’s best luxury experiences

Singapore is a sovereign city state Southeast Asia that  is increasingly becoming one of the most important global hubs for the luxury tourism for many reasons. It has gained important distinctions: as the most technological nation, world’s smartest city, as one of the world’s safest and cleanest countries,  and third largest financial center with the third-highest GDP per capita worldwide. This makes it one of the  most appreciated places to spend a vacation. So what are the most luxurious things that you can’t miss in Singapore?

1. Hotellerie

Regarding the hotellerie you can’t miss the opportunity to stay at Marina Bay Sands Hotel, on the Bay of Singapore. It was designed by architect Moshe Safdie and is the most expensive resort ever built,  at a cost of 8 billion Singapore dollars. With a casino, more than 300 retail stores and more than 80 restaurants ( including top chefs such as the Gordon Ramsey and Wolfgang Puck) it represents the perfect hotel for the shopping- and food-addicted. What makes the hotel special is the world’s largest rooftop infinity pool at the 57th floor where you can swim at a height of 200 meters and relax in the shade of a palm tree.

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2. Dining

If you would like to have a dining experience outside the box you should go to Hong Kong Soya Sauce Chicken Rice & Noodle Hawker stand in Singapore.

Here you will have the opportunity of eating a luxury food but in a traditional contest such as the hawker center. A hawker center is an open air complex housing many stalls that sell a variety of inexpensive food, starting from $1 with a maximum of $25. What makes this stall special is the fact that it sells cheap food, and in 2016 had received a Michelin star.  Here you can taste just one dish, a chicken with rice and soya sauce, with a price of 2 Singapore dollars (3 Euro).  During the years the recipe has always remained the same, handed down from father to daughter. 

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3. Shopping

Orchard Road is the perfect location for shopping in Singapore, a two-kilometres stretch of road named after the fruit orchards or the plantations that were common in this area in the 19th century. With thousands of shops, the most important mall is Tangs, founded in 1934 and established on Orchard Road in the 1950s. Orchard Central is a mall with an exterior featuring local artist Matthew Ngui’s digital art membrane. 

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How Milan Design Week got its start

Today two of the most important events in Milan are the “Fuorisalone” and the “Salone Internazionale del Mobile” or International Furniture Fair that are celebrated each year during the Design Week, now in its 58th edition. 

© Cristina Torriano

Every year, events take place all over Milan and design becames the main protagonist of the city, with visitors pouring in ftom all over the world. 

However, only a few people know the history of these events that started in the late 1960s.

At that time,  Italy’s economy was booming and Italian industries were riding the wave: it was in this economic scenario that the first Salone del Mobile took place. It was organized by Cosmit (the Italian Comitato Organizzatore del Salone del Mobile) in order to promote Italian furniture industry exports.

At the end of the 70s, Cassina – a well-known Italian design firm – was the first  company to use its own showroom for receiving its costumers, in order to provide them with a more informal location. 

In the following years, a lot of other companies decided to do the same thing as Cassina, creating events in their showrooms or in other uncommon locations: this could be considered the informal birth of today’s “Fuorisalone”.

In 1983, the magazine “Abitare” dedicated a full section to this new phenomenon and in 1991 the Cosmit decided to change the exposition, moving it from September to April.

Gilda Bojardi – director of the magazine “Interni”- organised the first Designer’s Week with events set up by all the showrooms in the heart of the city; and collected them in a complete and official guide. 

The event — which took place at the same time as the Salone – didn’t really have the same success. For this reason, they decided to connect the two occasions, marking the official birth of the “Fuorisalone”.

Little by little,  the “Salone”  was opened even to everyone and not only to the experts of the sector.

Since 2000, “ via Tortona” and its surroundings became another important design district.

Also, firms, companies and boutiques – both from inside and outside the design sector – started to organize parties and promotional events, where was easy to find famous designers, architects, journalists or industrialists, a part from the international jet set. 

Since 2006, the “Salone’s” trade fair has been moved outside the city centre, in a new area called “Fieramilano”, designed by the Italian architectural  firm Fuksas. 

Despite this change in the logistic organization of the Salone, the connection between the fair and the city remained unchanged. The Fuorisalone meanwhile has spread out across the city center. 

Today, Design Week has gained popularity all over the world and is considered internationally as the main exhibition for the design sector.  

The edition that just ended of the Fuorisalone hosted more than 1311 events, from  184 countries, 350,000 guests and 2350 industries, mainly concentrated in the areas of Brera, Tortona, Ventura Lambrate, San Babila, Isola e 5 vie.

Italy Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte gave a speech at the opening cerimony this year, an edition that also celebrated 500 years of Leonardo da Vinci’s birth. 

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A trip through the art and emotion of the world’s top jewellery maisons

They say that “ A piece of jewellery is often a piece of art. But it only becomes valuable when emotions are added to it.’’ Jewellery may seem like an extravagance, but to many, it’s an art form that allows wearers to express themselves. It brings to mind memories, emotions and many times helps us express feelings accompanied by our inner strength.

The word “jewellery” is derived from the Latin word ‘jocale,’ meaning “plaything,” and the word jewel, which was anglicized during the 13th century from the Old French word “jouel.” The word “jewellery” is used to describe any piece of precious material (gemstones, noble metals, etc.) used to adorn one’s self.

The article and the photo gallery look at 15 extravagant jewellery brands that offer the most exquisite pieces in the world.

 

  1. Boucheron

 

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In 2018, La Maison Boucheron celebrated 160 years of design and creation. Founded in 1858 by Frédéric Boucheron, it is the oldest jewelry Maison in Place Vendôme (26 Place Vendôme). Through the years the brand has become known for its bold, free style and eye-catching designs. Up until the 2000s—when it was acquired by the Gucci Group and subsequently, Kering—Boucheron was one of the few remaining family-owned brands.

  1. Buccellati

 

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In 1919, Mario Buccellati opened his first jewellery boutique on Largo Santa Margherita in Milan. It was born from a merger of a father and son’s brands. Buccellati is recognizable for its lace rings and necklaces along with a special form of engraving called Rigato. A Chinese company bought a controlling 85 percent share in the Italian company in 2016.

  1. Bvlgari

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“Surprise,” “innovate” and “reinvent” have been part of Bulgari’s vocabulary since it was founded in Rome in 1884 by Sotirios Voulgarise. The sexiness of its shapes, the sharpness of its lines, the sparkle of coloured stones: all are used with a purpose to blend creativity and an Italian sense of extravaganza. A good example of the Italian extravaganza theme is explored in the Festa collection, which highlights the Italian’s love for joyful celebrations. Bulgari is known for mixing precious and semi-precious stones in a way that brings its remarkable pieces to life.

  1. Cartier

 

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Founded in 1846 in Paris by Louis François Cartier, the first Cartier boutique was opened in 1859. Later, Louis-François’ son Alfred took over the business, moving it to the prestigious Rue de la Paix in the jewellery district of Paris. The panther is Cartier’s most recognizable design. The brand is known for its loyalty to its Art-Deco history, but it creates several lines that celebrate the Old-World elegance as well.

  1. Chaumet

 

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La Maison of Chaumet is one of the oldest jewellery brands in the world, founded by Marie-Etienne Nitot in 1780. He created the jewellery that would offer the aristocracy of the French Empire the necessary splendour and power. Moreover, la Maison creates precious jewellery and watch collections that reflect Parisian elegance and excellence. Chaumet is famous for its transformable high jewellery pieces and unique timepieces.

  1. Chopard

 

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The Swiss Maison of Chopard was founded in 1860 by Louis-Ulysse Chopard. In 1963, Chopard was sold to watchmaker Karl Scheufele, and his kin still own the brand to this day. La Maison’s extraordinary timepieces helped build a reputation of reliability and quality for Swiss-made products.

  1. De Beers

 

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De Beers began the search for nature’s most exquisite and magnificent prizes over 125 years ago. La Maison is known for its exceptional diamonds and  popular for its high jewellery, and calls itself  “The Jeweller of Light.” In addition to jewellery making, the De Beers Group is involved in diamond mining. Through the years, the brand has discovered a couple of legendary diamonds that have become famous such as the 203.04-carat Millenium Star.

  1. De Grisogono

 

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De Grisogono is a Swiss luxury jeweller. It was founded in Geneva, in 1993 by black diamond specialist Fawaz Gruosi. Under the brand, Gruosi makes otherworldly pieces that use bold design and unique materials mixed with bespoke craftsmanship. One of his most famous pieces, a 163.41-carat Flawless D-Colour diamond necklace, cut from the historic 404-carat diamond, known as the “Art of de Grisogono, Creation 1,” sold for a record-breaking $33.7 million in a 2017’s Christie’s sale.

  1. Garrard

 

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La Maison of Garrard is one of the oldest jewellery brands in the world. Its origins can be traced back to 1735, when master silversmith George Wicks opened a store on Panton Street in London. It was in this year that the firm received its first royal commission from Frederick, Prince of Wales. Every piece of Garrard is developed to achieve a balance between tradition and design so as to bring out the natural beauty of the stones. The result is a quintessentially British hallmark of heritage, detail and craft.

  10.Graff 

 

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Laurence Graff is the founder of Graff house in London in 1960. His fascination with the emotional power of gemstones has transformed Graff into a global hallmark of innovation, creativity and craftsmanship. What makes Graff’s collection special is not just the craftsmanship or the quality of the gemstones and metals used. Rather, it’s the size of the stones Graff uses in its jewellery line.

   11.Harry Winston

 

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Founded in New York City in 1932, by Mr. Harry Winston – an innate gemologist, an intuitive business man – the brand continues to set the standard for the ultimate in fine jewellery and high-end watchmaking. Winston was known throughout his life as the “King of Diamonds” and the “Jeweler to the Stars.” Today, La Maison continues its tradition of creativity, rarity, and quality without compromise in its retail salons around the world.

   12.Mikimoto

 

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Founded in 1893, by the pearl king, Kokichi Mikimoto. His quest for perfection and his love for these pure, lustrous gems of the sea were the guiding forces that built the Maison. Today, Mikimoto is the foremost producer of the finest quality cultured pearls and a world leader in the design of exceptional jewellery. Each piece of Mikimoto reflects the purity of the ocean and the mystery of creation.

   13. Piaget

 

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The Maison is a Swiss luxury watchmaker and jeweller. Founded in 1874 by Georges Piaget in the village of La Côte-aux-Fées, Piaget is currently a subsidiary of the Swiss Richemont group. Piaget has established itself in the world of luxury jewellery and watches by producing excellent and timeless pieces.

   14. Tiffany&Co

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Founded by Charles Lewis Tiffany in 1837, the first Tiffany & Co store opened in New York City. The brand is renowned for its luxury goods and is particularly known for its diamond and sterling silver jewellery. It markets itself as an arbiter of taste and style.

   15.Van Cleef & Arpels

 

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Founded in 1906 by Alfred Van Cleef and his uncle Salomon Arpels in Paris. La Maison has always remained faithful to the values of creation, expertise and transmission. Inspired by the Maison’s unique identity and heritage, each jewellery and watch collection tells a story with universal meaning to express a poetic view of life. Van Cleef & Arpels is mostly popular for its Alhambra motif—a classic symbol of luck, true love, health, and wealth—that’s seen in necklaces, pearls, and earrings.

 

Photo credit:

  1. Boucheron website, viewed April 2nd 2019.
  2. Buccellati  website, viewed April 2nd 2019.
  3. Bulgari website, viewed April 2nd 2019.
  4. Cartier website, viewed April 2nd 2019.
  5. Chalet website, viewed April 2nd 2019.
  6. Chopard website, viewed April 2nd 2019.
  7. De Beers website, viewed April 2nd 2019.
  8. De Grisogono website, viewed April 2nd 2019.
  9. Gerrard website, viewed April 2nd 2019.
  10. Graff website, viewed April 2nd 2019.
  11. Harry Winston website, viewed April 2nd 2019.
  12. Mikimoto website, viewed April 2nd 2019.
  13. Piaget website, viewed April 2nd 2019.
  14. Tiffany&Co website, viewed April 2nd 2019.
  15. Van Cleef & Arpels website, viewed April 2nd 2019.

Dolce & Gabbana knows how to collaborate

 

The luxury fashion brand Dolce&Gabbana was founded by Italian designers Domenico Dolce and Stefano Gabbana in the year 1985.Creative design, Italian ornaments and love for Sicily made the duo’s distinctive look well-suited to  different and unexpected collaborations with other brands. Let’s have a look at their creativity. Continue reading “Dolce & Gabbana knows how to collaborate”

The growing importance of Chinese millennials for the luxury sector

As we all know, millennials are people born between 1982 and 1997 and are – nowadays- considered to be a powerful group of consumers by brands all over the world.

If we look at  Italian millennials —  who are  still in search of  career  stability and therefore  often struggle with low wages – it’s hard to picture this category as an engine for the high-end market.

But looking at overall data, we can clearly see that millennials are very active in the luxury market. According to the “True-Luxury Consumer Insight” study carried out by BCG and Altagamma in 2017, by 2024 millennials are expected to account for 50% of total luxury expenditure. These figures are even more surprising when talking about  Chinese millennials: they are responsible for 33% of the global expenditure when it comes to luxury products, and this is expected in the near future (to 45%). (Source: “Worldwide Luxury Market Monitor”, Altagamma and Bain&Co 2017).

Chinese millennials need to be monitored because their influence will be crucial in the change of the geography of luxury. With the duty-free policy applied by the Chinese government from  July 2017  on the import of high-end products,  Chinese consumers will buy more and more at home: by 2025, Chinese shoppers will make 50% of their purchases in their country. (Source: Il Sole 24 Ore, November 2018).

Considering all these factors, its clear that brands need to market this specific segment of consumers: but what can a brand do to actually reach and attract them?

Fendi as a case history 

A successful example of this attempt is Fendi’s launch of its FF reloaded capsule collection last year.

In June 2018, this collection was presented with a huge event in Shanghai with the clear aim of attracting  Chinese millennials.  Considering that China is the greatest market for the brand right now – where it has already opened 20 shops – it was essential to find a way to communicate Fendi’s DNA in a modern way.

 

 

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The real protagonist of the event was the Chinese rapper Jackson Wang, author of the song Fendiman and the new ambassador of Fendi in China. For the first time in the history of a Chinese artist, the song — released for the event — was number one on iTunes in 11 countries, and the artist’s Youtube channel was seen by 6.4 million people in just one day: another confirmation of the importance and power of this type of strategy  for brands nowadays.

The rapper was invited to film the song in a video clip in Rome, on the rooftop of Palazzo della Civiltà Italiana, headquarters of the Italian Maison: “We brought Rome to Shanghai” said Chiara Monfardini, worldwide communication director for Fendi.

 

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But this wasn’t the first time Fendi did something specifically for this market.

In 2017, the brand presented the China Peekaboo Project.

Fendi commissioned six Chinese celebrities – Liu Wen, Guo Jingjing, Angelababy, Yang Lan, Liang  Yuanwei, and Tim Yip – to customize a special edition of the handbag designed more than 10 years ago by Silvia Venturini Fendi.

 

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The aim of the project was to showcase the compelling versatility of the Peekaboo as well as the alluring creativity and diversity of Fendi’s Chinese muses.

 

Sources for pictures:

https://luxexpose.com/fendi-presents-the-china-peekaboo-project/

https://esquiresg.com/fendi-partied-in-shanghai-and-debuted-jackson-wangs-fendiman-music-video/

Jackson Wang’s Instagram 

Eataly CEO Farinetti’s TEDx talk examines a new definition of luxury

TEDx is an independent program connected to  TED TALKS (Acronym for Technology, Entertainment and Design), a non-profit organization that started in California over 30 years ago. These talks are a diverse way to express new ideas in smaller cities or to share them to small groups of people. The main aim is to inspire and motivate discussions about a specific topic, with each talk lasting a maximum of eighteen minutes.

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Last November 10th, my hometown Treviso was given the opportunity to host a Tedx. The main topic of the event was rediscovering humanity in a period marked by technological discoveries: Psyche versus  Technè. Psyche represented emotions and the nature of humanity (human feelings), whereas Technè represented art, a production of the spirit and human intelligence, strictly linked to technology (Inventions). The main objective of the talks was to convince the audience to start asking themselves about life and feel emotions once again, especially considering the era in which we live where everything is affected by technology and we no longer think for ourselves.

One of the most important speakers  was Oscar Farinetti,  CEO of Eataly. Farinetti is known for having created the first luxury supermarket to promote the excellence of  Italian product s worldwide. In the last  ten years he had opened more than 40 sales points, 22 in Italy and 18 abroad (including Seoul, San Paolo, the United States, Japan, Dubai, Moscow, Istanbul and Monaco). Today, he is trying to go public on the stock exchange. From the old format of promoting cuisine via for example the food hall, he ventured out to a more innovative showplace for Italian food and wine. Farinetti’s  main point  was the ability to copy – the ability to copy from a great idea. It made me understand  how all the important luxury companies, such as Gucci, are really only copying from the old  archives of the past (for  example,   Alessandro Michele of Gucci with the Richard Ginori archives). Old archives where  human emotions are  strongly linked to the product, in an era when it was  difficult to do things due to lack of  technology.

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According to Farinetti “We all have a biodiversity that we didn’t decide to have. We didn’t decide where to be born, when and into which family and this is the magnificence of our imperfection.”  I believe  this is what brought about Farinetti ‘s success, his ability to think outside the box and not obsess over perfection. What surprised me most was this different perception of luxury, the example of a new luxury. As he said in an interview: “Luxury, as most people think of it, is a concept that bores me.  But Eataly can be considered a luxury experience, if you look at it from two different perspectives — respect and time — which to me represents the new frontier of luxury.” With the term respect, he means in terms of our relationship with the planet. “As for the other element-time — this is the biggest luxury there is. The idea of being able to use your time as you please.”
Source:

https://www.tedxtreviso.com/

https://www.tedxtreviso.com/media-gallery-2018/

https://www.eataly.net/it_it/

A day in the life of a Fashion photographer

by Andrea Vittorio Castelli

Being a fashion show photographer is very tiring, much more than you could imagine.

Let’s took a look at a “day in the life” of your average fashion fotographer. During a fashion week, they can work up to twelve hours each day, in aggressively competitive conditions where every photographer must shoot their best moments to sell a photo and get press office approval.

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This has always been a competitive sector, but never more than now. A fashion photographer’s work has been transformed;   above all, they now need to be as fast and efficient as possible for both magazines and online press.  Once there were only the photographers standing at the end of the catwalk, at the special platform reserved only for them. Now they must jostle for space with video-makers, bloggers, and social media workers, as long as they have a camera. Freelance photographers, on the other hand, are people (called runners) who literally run into the agency with memory cards and deliver photos in a short time. A lot of photographers now just use their iPhones to shoot, that’s why a lot of professional photographers feel frustrated when they are using maybe a €5000 camera.

Anyway, the agencies (like Getty images) have at least two or more photographers who share the fashion shows of the day, they have their workstation at the end of the catwalk on a platform where the photographers stand.  Then photo agencies sell photographs, often to magazines, newspapers, advertising companies, event organizers, etc. The photographer, therefore, lets the agency deal with the sale, but they have to be fast:  the competition is intense!

During the shows,  taxis are not easy to find and photographers usually move from one place to another on foot, carrying their heavy equipment in their backpack. They travel by subway to avoid street traffic. When they can,  they go by scooter or bicycle or any fast vehicle, because they have to get the perfect shot before their competitors. Photographers generally know each other and respect a sort of hierarchy in positions, based above all on the importance of the agency they work for. But they can also work directly for the brand because the most important brands have their own photographers.

Another category, which has grown in recent years, is the “street style photographers.” They photograph people dressed well or in an eccentric way outside the fashion shows, like for example celebrities, bloggers or people who do not even enter the  fashion shows but  love being photographed wearing fashionable clothes because they are inspired by the new collection of the season

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Despite all this competition, some photographers have their own business. In fact, they are usually hired directly by newspapers or agencies,  and a magazine can pay a lot of money for a famous photographer. Newspapers, especially online magazines, use these photos to get their readers inspired and sometimes copy the looks. It seems that street style photographers now create trends, fashion icons and are almost as important as the fashion shows themselves because often the real fashion show takes place outside the show.

Nowadays anyone can take a picture. But just a few good photographers are left, so don’t despair,  young photographers.  There is room for you in this amazing but stressful profession!

CELINE 1.0: A new concept signed by Hedi Slimane

Since it was announced that Hedi Slimane would be succeeding Phoebe Philo as the creative direction of Céline, it was clear that some major changes were in program at the fashion house.

Certainly, the change of designer came with a compete new brand direction; now that Slimane has taken over as the brand’s artistic, creative, and image director, Céline deleted its entire Instagram account last September to reveal its new logo; most notably, the new Céline under Slimane comes with one key difference—the accent on the é has been erased, making the brand simply Celine. For this reason, all eyes were on Hedi Slimane last season in September as he sent his first collection for Celine down the runway at Paris Fashion Week.

Thanks to social media and live streaming technology, initial reactions to Slimane’s first show came hard and fast, in real time, as soon as the first few looks appeared on the runway. The designer proposed skinny suits, sparkly, super-short party dresses, sharp leather motorcycle jackets and that sort of minimal accessories that are as cool as they are classic. People expressed immediately feelings about the show on Twitter and Instagram, many of them could be described as disappointment, disdain, anger, disbelief and mourning for former designer Phoebe Philo’s era of the brand.

Business of Fashion’s Lauren Sherman reported that on the day of Slimane’s Celine show, a group of women — high-profile fashion editors and department store buyers among them — gathered in Paris to celebrate Philo’s Celine; on Instagram, it was even created an account for the nostalgics called @oldceline.

For some, it was a sacrilege to replace Philo’s entire aesthetic with a much younger, much showier, much less-subtle collection without keeping a single element of her work.

Furthermore, for many Celine fans, Hedi Slimane’s erasure of Phoebe Philo’s work couldn’t have arrived at a worse moment. Coming up in the middle of the Harvey Weinstein allegations that kicked the #MeToo movement into high gear — and the two-year anniversary of President Trump’s election — this is a time when women are fighting hard against the forces that would silence them by speaking out against sexual predators and running for office. 

For many people the hatred for Slimane seems particularly appropriate to our times, when Donald Trump’s politics of division, cable news and social media have made everything intensely personal and turned public discourse into a daily shouting match.

Fashion often isn’t intended to be overtly political, but it’s impossible not to see what we wear through the lens of what’s happening around us; clothes reflect the times, they are how we armor ourselves to move through the world.

On the other hand, Slimane has hit back at critics of his debut show for Celine, saying those who accused him of misogyny for showing women dressed in short skirts were conservative and puritanical, suggesting there was a homophobic undertone to the outpouring of vitriol on social networks and defended his collection arguing that the young women in his show were just liberated and carefree.

LVMH Moët Hennessy Louis Vuitton, the luxury conglomerate that owns Celine alongside brands such as Louis Vuitton, Dior and Fendi, is confident Slimane will deliver huge sales gains. Also, LVMH chairman and chief executive officer Bernard Arnault has said he expects the “global superstar” designer to herald a doubling or tripling of Celine’s turnover within five years.

Against every expectation, taking inspiration from the old Celine — particularly the ’70s era in which it began to expand worldwide — Slimane channeled the French bourgeoisie for his F/W 2019-20, offering up his own take on daily wardrobes, while keeping them fresh for modern consumers. Public opinion considered the pieces timeless and well-made for women who start their day at 7 a.m. and know perfectly who they are and what they want. Slimane’s bourgeois woman was appreciated by the press and Fashion experts which makes us think that the powers of being at LVMH will very shortly enjoy the fruits of his labor.

Photo credits

https://fashionweekdaily.com/hedi-slimane-bad-reviews-lacoste/

http://www.dazeddigital.com/fashion/article/41186/1/celine-logo-debut-campaign-hedi-slimane-paris-fashion-week-ss19-new-york

http://www.dazeddigital.com/fashion/article/39599/1/how-hedi-slimane-could-spend-his-11-5m-dollar-kering-lawsuit-winnings

https://www.marieclaire.com.au/celine-hedi-slimane-debut

For these luxury brands, Women’s Day is every day.

Last week on March 8 we celebrated International Women’s Day, with billboards, special T-shirts, and celebrity testimonials. This day had a lot of important messages: women’s strength, uniqueness and equality for all!

Nowadays women no longer want to be appreciated only for their beauty or their ability to take care of the family. And yet women are still not paid and/or treated equally; and not only in poor or very religious countries as one might expect. No, all over the world. And it is time to pay attention to these strong messages.

That’s why many luxury brands today encourage women and support their ambitions, intelligence, strength of character and personal achievements. Nowadays it is not that important any more to be just a “beautiful picture.” More and more famous brands choose women ambassadors that reflect the spirit and character, the power and enthusiasm, and represent the company’s values in society.

For example, American actress Natalie Portman has been the leading lady of Dior fragrances since 2010, when she became the face of Miss Cherie. This choice was not made by chance. Portman has been honored with many awards and nominations not only for her acting work, but also for various humanitarian and educational activities. When Portman was asked what kind of woman Dior perfume is made for, she replied: “A woman who is fearless, strong and confident while also being very feminine and soft.”

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Another successful woman who represents Christian Dior is Marion Cottilard, starting in 2008. She made film history becoming the first person to win an Academy Award for Best actress in a non-English language performance.

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The cosmetic giant Lancôme prefers to be represented by women celebrities that have a real personality. Among the ambassadors of the brand are Julia Roberts and Kate Winslet – actresses who are distinguished by unusual beauty, but with incredible charisma and personality.

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Luxury cosmetic brand Guerlain and fashion brand Calvin Klein have been represented by Natalia Vodianova for many years. Natalia is not only a world-famous model and mother of four children, but also an active philanthropist. After supporting different charities, in 2004 she decided to set up her own Naked Heart Foundation. In 2018  Chopard decided to  support  the Naked Heart Foundation through a special edition of the Happy Hearts Collection bracelets .Ten percent of proceeds from sales of the bracelet will be donated to the charity which supports children with special needs

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French car maker Citroen chose style icon Iris Apfel in 2016, at the age of 94. Apfel is known for her vibrant wardrobe and oversized glasses, and fronted the brand’s “Driven by Style” campaign. “When you don’t dress like everyone else, you don’t have to think like everyone else” always was Iris’s credo.

iris

During 2018 we got more unusual brand collaborations with empowering women.

“Tiffany City HardWear” is the full name of the Tiffany & Co. campaign that takes successful pop superstar Lady Gaga as it outstanding new ambassador. When Tiffany was asked why they had chosen Lady Gaga as an ambassador, the answer was simple: her originality, creativity and courage were the characteristics that caught our attention.

lady-gaga-wears-tiff_4404

Dior’s spring campaign features Sasha Pivovarova, the model and artist who opened Maria Grazia Chiuri’s spring runway show wearing a T-shirt emblazoned with the title of Linda Nochlin’s influential essay, “Why Have There Been No Great Women Artists?” Showcasing pride in their star, the house of Dior organized private exhibit of Sasha’s works during New York fashion week.

dior_spring-summer_2018_ad-campaign-2

Escada tapped Amber Valletta for its colour-charged spring 2018 campaign, pointing to the iconic model’s “strength, authenticity and humor”. “Our brand is all about colour and empowering effect it can have”,   Escada CEO Iris Epple-Righi commented. “The campaign also marks the strong embrace of our heritage. The business was founded by a woman for women, and it began in the Seventies, a time when women in business were especially rare. This spirit of female strength balanced with playfulness is in our DNA,” she said.

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I would like to finish this article with a quote from Michelle Obama:

“There is no limit to what we,as women, can accomplish”

 

Zarina Seyidova

 

 

Foto credits:

1.https://www.fragrantica.com/news/Dior-Miss-Dior-Blooming-Bouquet-5061.html

2.http://www.justjared.com/photo-gallery/3793166/marion-cotillard-lady-dior-campaign-05/

3.https://www.pinterest.de/pin/328340629060121825/

4.http://www.artsphere.fr/en/media/8291-david-bellemere-guerlain-terracotta-2016-natalia-vodianova-artsphere

5.https://www.areadomani.it/2016/04/29/6-consigli-stile-iris-apfel/

6.https://fashionista.com/2017/04/lady-gaga-tiffany-co-campaign

7.https://fashionista.com/2018/01/dior-spring-2018-ad-campaign

8.https://www.hawtcelebs.com/amber-valletta-for-escada-winter-fall-2018-campaign/

Using the five senses of wine marketing

Nowadays people can buy anything they want, wherever and whenever they want. The market offers a huge range of choices, perhaps too many. The buying process is driven by many different factors, and marketing and communication are fundamental tools used in persuasion.

This is also true for the wine sector, where wineries are able to transmit oenologists’ work and passion to the final customer through marketing, communication and packaging. This kind of communication happens in two different moments and evokes all five senses.

iconfinder_10_2529923.pngThe first way in which the wineries transmit their message is the purchasing moment. A customer has to choose the wine bottle from a wide range of other competitors. The choice is driven firstly by sight, which is influenced by colours, shapes, writing, lights and shelf position. The customer is going to exclude “neutral” bottles and focus on the ones that capture their emotional interest. As many of us know, colours can stimulate emotions and these feelings can drive our purchasing process. Due to this, appealing colours and images on labels are strongly linked to sales.

iconfinder_hand-stop-o_1608369.png

The second sense of interacting with the customer is touch. Everyone purchasing a wine bottle is going to grab it from the shelf and feel it. At that moment the shape, the weight, the kind of paper used for the label and the reliefs, deliver a different sense of quality to the possible consumer.

The purchase is completed when the customer is satisfied with what they see and feel when they choose the bottle.

The second moment in which the wineries can use communication to distinguish themselves is in the opening and tasting of the wine. This is a ritual. A ritual in which all five senses play a part. A moment full of pathos.

icons8-hearing-52.pngThe hands have to open the bottle in an elegant way, cutting the plastic capsule and uncorking the bottle. The sounds can be different, powerful and louder for champagnes or quieter for still wines. Moreover, the customer can hear the magic gurgle of wine as it is poured from the bottle into the glass.

The glass of wine is able to show us an incredible spectrum of colours, these colours are the oenologists’ work. They are able to provide the right colour to their wine due to a knowledgeable use of grape skins during the winemaking process.

icons8-runny-nose-90.png

The sense of smell is divided into a glass of wine between emotional feeling and organoleptic perception. This ritual step brings memories and feelings to the mind because memories and feelings are linked emotionally to those perceptions arising from wine flavours.

icons8-drinking-240.png

Finally, taste. The sense that is the result of the soil and winery work, the one most strongly influenced by the other four. Wine taste delivers physically the winery’s message to the customers. Each step should be studied and developed by the winery team in order to give rise to those emotions coming from the customers’ taste experiences. 

Due to this personal reflection, I believe that winemakers and marketing and communication experts have several reasons to work together. If the wine is great, then marketing has an easier job. If communication is great too, winemakers are able to show their ability to final customers in the best way. Winemakers and marketers must not to be in competition, but they must be complementary.

Federico Dallari Bondanini

The five senses of wine marketing

Nowadays people can buy anything they want, wherever and whenever they want. The market offers a huge range of choices, perhaps too many. The buying process is driven by many different factors, and marketing and communication are fundamental tools used in persuasion.

This is also true for the wine sector, where wineries are able to transmit oenologists’ work and passion to the final customer through marketing, communication and packaging. This kind of communication happens in two different moments and evokes all five senses.

iconfinder_10_2529923.pngThe first way in which the wineries transmit their message is the purchasing moment. A customer has to choose the wine bottle from a wide range of other competitors. The choice is driven firstly by sight, which is influenced by colours, shapes, writing, lights and shelf position. The customer is going to exclude “neutral” bottles and focus on the ones that capture their emotional interest. As many of us know, colours can stimulate emotions and these feelings can drive our purchasing process. Due to this, appealing colours and images on labels are strongly linked to sales.

iconfinder_hand-stop-o_1608369.png

The second sense of interacting with the customer is touch. Everyone purchasing a wine bottle is going to grab it from the shelf and feel it. At that moment the shape, the weight, the kind of paper used for the label and the reliefs, deliver a different sense of quality to the possible consumer.

The purchase is completed when the customer is satisfied with what they see and feel when they choose the bottle.

The second moment in which the wineries can use communication to distinguish themselves is in the opening and tasting of the wine. This is a ritual. A ritual in which all five senses play a part. A moment full of pathos.

icons8-hearing-52.pngThe hands have to open the bottle in an elegant way, cutting the plastic capsule and uncorking the bottle. The sounds can be different, powerful and louder for champagnes or quieter for still wines. Moreover, the customer can hear the magic gurgle of wine as it is poured from the bottle into the glass.

The glass of wine is able to show us an incredible spectrum of colours, these colours are the oenologists’ work. They are able to provide the right colour to their wine due to a knowledgeable use of grape skins during the winemaking process.

icons8-runny-nose-90.png

The sense of smell is divided into a glass of wine between emotional feeling and organoleptic perception. This ritual step brings memories and feelings to the mind because memories and feelings are linked emotionally to those perceptions arising from wine flavours.

icons8-drinking-240.png

Finally, taste. The sense that is the result of the soil and winery work, the one most strongly influenced by the other four. Wine taste delivers physically the winery’s message to the customers. Each step should be studied and developed by the winery team in order to give rise to those emotions coming from the customers’ taste experiences. 

Due to this personal reflection, I believe that winemakers and marketing and communication experts have several reasons to work together. If the wine is great, then marketing has an easier job. If communication is great too, winemakers are able to show their ability to final customers in the best way. Winemakers and marketers must not to be in competition, but they must be complementary.

Federico Dallari Bondanini

Karl Lagerfeld’s last Chanel show was a farewell à la mode

 By Laura Dolfi

His spirit is everywhere” wrote Laurence Benaïm, journalist at Business of Fashion, after the passing of fashion’s most iconic figure, designer Karl Lagerfeld. Chanel’s emotional Fall/Winter 2019 RTW show in Paris was only a few days ago, and Benaïm’s statement couldn’t be more true. Continue reading “Karl Lagerfeld’s last Chanel show was a farewell à la mode”

5 tips for becoming a sustainable Fashion Addict

image: https://colpoditacco.me/tag/mexes/

Did you know that the fashion industry is considered the second-most polluting industry in the world? In fact this sector is responsible for 10% of CO2 total emissions and the death of 70 million trees for the production of certain fabrics such as viscose, rayon or lyocell. So as consumers, what can we do in order to protect our planet and continue to be fashion victims

We can start following these five simple tips:

  1. Choose sustainable brands. Today many brands are taking environmental problems into account and choose not to use some fabrics or leathers that can cause environmental damage. So we should be aware about which brands are sustainable and which ones are not.
  2. Buy vintage,  or rent clothes. Apart from second – hand shops, where we can buy products at cheaper prices, another recent trend is the one of renting. In fact, today, people prefer to rent online – usually through specialized websites – products they love instead of owning them. In this way, not only we can be more sustainable, but also we can satisfy our desire to wear always something new.
  3. Check material and buy good quality. During the act of purchasing, price has usually a major role. But when it comes to sustainability, we should also pay attention to what is the actual composition of what we are buying. It’s very important to check and choose clothes that are made of sustainable fabrics or materials,  also considering that a lot of materials are not healthy for our skins or health in general. 
  4. Modify the cloth that we already have in our wardrobes. What if I tell you that what you are looking for- sometimes – can be just in front of your nose? Rarely we consider the possibility to take things that we already own and to transform them into what we are looking for. Indeed, sometimes having a bit of creativity and imagination can help us to save a lot of money and to find what we are searching with a few sartorial works.
  5. Don’t buy immediately. Last but not least in our list (LOL) we need to change our mental approach and attitude when it comes to purchasing. Usually when we find something that we like, we immediately buy it without taking into account our real needs. My suggestion is not to buy immediately what you like but to think about it: if you already own something similar, see if it will be useful for you and when. Sometimes, the best thing to do is not to buy the same day, but maybe the day after. This system allows us to understand if we really want that item or not.

This small piece of advice will help all of us to be more sustainable consumers and save money for things that – maybe–  we need more. Try to follow these tips  but – of course – when we are talking about sales, you can skip number 5 and go for it!

Dior: Designer of Dreams – continuing the conversation

By Miranda Bud

The date is February 12th 1947, the location is 30 Avenue Montaigne, Paris, and Christian Dior has just unveiled his new collection. Little did he know then that it was to be the beginning of a new era in fashion and the basis for a brand that would become internationally renowned and adored. 

Continue reading “Dior: Designer of Dreams – continuing the conversation”

4 places where groceries meet luxury

Imagine you are in between fashion shows during Fashion Week (either Paris or London) and you are super hungry. What’s better than a visit to a luxury food store to clear the mind? Wouldn’t it be nice to have a take-away ready meal prepared by expert chefs and artisans, accompanied by a bottle of good wine?

Here there are the most famous high-end grocery stores in the four main fashion cities: Milano, London, Paris and New York City. 

Peck

In 1883, Francesco Peck decided to open a butcher shop in Via Orefici 2 in Milan, which at that time was already seen as the economic capital of Italy. The shop became the main supplier for Italy’s Royal Family as well as the most important families of the Milanese elite. After many renovations and relocations, in 1956 Peck moved to its current spot in via Spadari, and became the first choice for people working in offices in the center of Milan.  In fact, offering lots of ready-made meals and gourmet panini to eat at the counter of the store, Peck made people leave the company canteen and have a more delightful lunch. Nowadays Peck offers an incredible range of high end products: from raw to ready-made meals, from gastronomic treats like meat, salami, cheese, bread to pastry and a big wine cellar. The store has really anything you can ask for.

In 2013 Peck was bought by the Marzotto family and today is still in line with the times,  and is still a symbol of the city of Milan.

Peck is located in via Spadari 9, Milan.

 

https://www.flawlessmilano.com/en/peck/

Fortnum & Mason

Founded in 1707 by William Fortnum and Hugh Mason, this luxury department store has been a landmark in the city of London for more than 300 years. From its beginning, F&M’s reputation was based on fine food such as chocolate, coffee and tea, but also,  most importantly, on the famous Scottish eggs. According to legend, these eggs were created by Fortnum and Mason themselves as a ready-made meal for people who wanted to have a comfy food.

Tea collections are maybe the best-selling items in the store, with prices that go from £5 to above £50. They are in fact very delicious in terms of taste and pretty outside, with beautiful packaging and full of color. The hamper is another icon of this London grocery store: a sort of basket full of fine food, gifts, wine and delights seen as a nice gift for the holidays like Easter, Christmas or even Mother’s Day. In this case prices for the hampers vary depending on what kind of food and wine are inside, going above £400 for most expensive ones.

You can find the original Fortnum & Mason store in 181 Piccadilly, London.

 

https://www.fortnumandmason.com

La Grande Épicerie de Paris

Owned by LVMH, la Grande Épicerie de Paris is housed inside the Bon Marché Rive Gauche, an historic department store founded in 1839 by Aristide Boucicaut.

Nowadays it is a great spot to do a bit of high-end grocery shopping, with products ranging from vegetables to meat, from bakery to pastry and so on. Furthermore, the store is known for its cellar offering an exclusive selection of wine and spirits from premium access to very high-end ones. A curious and special addition to the store is the exclusive baking, patisserie and gastronomy workshop for both adults and children to help them produce unique recipes from unique products. Inside the store you will find artisans working and delighting you with their savoir-faire, making your stay an incredible luxury experience.

La Grande Épicerie de Paris is located at 38, rue de Sèvres, Paris.

 

https://flashmatin.fr/traiteur-la-grande-epicerie-de-paris
https://www.lvmh.com

Dean & DeLuca

The original store was opened in 1977 in SoHo by Joel Dean and Giorgio DeLuca, bringing a successful brand-new shift to grocery shopping.

Nowadays Dean & DeLuca is a brand known internationally for luxury food – in fact the brand has eight stores in the United States and almost 20 abroad. The emporium sells every kind of gourmet food from chocolate to meat and seafood, from oils and vinegars to dressing and sauces. Dean & DeLuca is also very much known for their flowers and the smell they make throughout the store. Their best sellers are mostly snacks and sweets, like for example their Chocolate and Cinnamon Babka ($28), some special taste popcorn such as the Caramel and Chipotle Popcorn ($2.75) or the Acacia Black Truffle Honey ($18.50).

The original  Dean & DeLuca store is still in 560 Broadway, Manhattan, New York City.

 

https://www.standard.co.uk/go/london/restaurants/new-york-s-finest-deli-dean-deluca-coming-to-mayfair-a3309806.html
https://www.pinterest.it/deananddeluca/pins/

 

By Carolina Panzera

Antonello da Messina: a change in perspective

 

Imagine you’ve just arrived in Milan, and you’re trying to decide what to do and see first.  Allow me to help you. The new exhibition in Palazzo Reale of works by  Antonello da Messina is in  the perfect location for you to visit once you’ve seen the famous piazza Duomo.

Let me introduce the artist first. As his name suggests, he was born in Messina (Sicily) in 1430, at a time when  Messina  was a very busy route for Mediterranean commerce. This helped Antonello to get in touch with different kinds of art and people. He was one of the most important painters of the 15th century. His works and skills were able to influence even painters of the Venetian Renaissance.

When you enter  the exhibition, you are greeted by a sign on  a red wall saying “dentro la pittura del maestro del Quattrocento italiano.” Translated, this means you are “inside the painting of the master of the Italian 1400s.”  From the moment you enter,  and you start admiring those magnificent works of art, you get completely stunned.

Antonello da Messina’s portaits of human beings  are so realistic. They give you the impression that you are staring at a physical person.   They are capable of  transferring the emotions and the thoughts of the subject directly to the viewer.  Giving you the wish, the desire to talk with them.

http://artunframed.com/Gallery/shop/portrait-of-a-young-man-8/

Continuing the tour of  his artistic life, you will find a lot of Christian religious drawings representing the Virgin, angels and Christ during biblical events. One of the most important is “Annunciata di Palermo,” which is conserved at the  palazzo Abatellis in Palermo. It describes the Virgin’s reaction to the annunciation of the Angel telling her she will be the mother of Jesus.

https://www.studentville.it/appunti/antonello-da-messina/

You can’t leave before you have admired “San Girolamo nello Studio” one of the masterpieces of the European Renaissance. It is in the National Gallery in London. The great skills of the painter are clear in this work. He was so capable of playing with  colours and shades, giving  the painting a great harmony and deepness thanks to his knowledge of perspective. He truly cared about details, even the smallest ones, like the books on the shelves, the peacock or the lion hidden in the shadows. The saint, as represented by Antonello, is truly  focused on humanistic studies. Antonello had a great taste for the interior rooms.

So, what are you waiting for? Come and get to know one of the most fascinating artists ever. I am sure you won’t regret it.

Cristiano Amato

Breitling and the motor industry: an historic relationship

UnknownSwiss watchmaker Breitling and the famous British luxury car manufacturer Bentley have worked together since 2003. This fruitful friendship started when Breitling was chosen to design an onboard clock for Bentley’s iconic Continental GT. The collaboration continued with some highly (missing word here) releases and an entire Breitling for Bentley line of automotive-inspired watches.

As George Kern, CEO of Breitling said in a press release: Bentley and Breitling share lots of values. Both brands are known for quality, performance and design excellence, and both can build on powerful legacies.. It’s an ideal partnership.”

The deal between Breitling and Bentley has its roots in Breitling’s history of collaboration with the motor industry.. The watchmaker’s  dashboard chronograph for the aviation industry was created in 1931, and was later adapted for car dashboards. There is a personal relationship between Breitling and Bentley, that goes back  70 years with Willie Breitling, the visionary inventor, who  in the 1940s  was often seen  driving between Geneva and La Chaux-de-Fonds in one of his Bentleys.

Bentley can boast success on the race tracks. Between 1924 and 1930, the famous Bentley Boys won  the Le Mans 24Hours five times. Those successes are not just only in the past.  In  2003, Bentley went  back to Le Mans, ranking first and second. In this famous race, Breitling was team Bentley’s sponsor with a limited chronograph, the Bentley Le Mans, created for celebrating its victory.

This time, the watches made for Bentley will be part of the base offer for  every client and will be presented as a Breitling for Bentley collection. The first watch to be created is Premier B01 Chronograph 42 Bentley Racing Green, characterized by an engraving “Bentley” with a  design  inspired by the historical “Blower” Bentley dashboard from the 1929.

As part of this renewed partnership, to help Bentley celebrate its 100th anniversary, the Swiss watch-maker will create a limited edition available for all.

Adrian Hallmark, Bentley Motors CEO said in an official statement: “As we approach our centenary year, we will, of course, be celebrating our past, but, more importantly, we will be looking toward the future with passion for innovation.”

Partnership between Breitling and Bentley is based  mostly on their similar heritage, their passion, their values, but most importantly they share commitment to technological excellence, expertise of craftsmanship and a pioneering spirit.

Breitling is a longstanding expert, creator of luxurious and elegant watches which attracts a wider target. While exploring the possibility offered by this collaboration, Breitling and Bentley are looking forward to sharing new and unique models and for discerning men and women around the world.

Cioncia Carola 

Sources:

http://www.auto.it/news/saloni/francoforte/2017/08/30-1014308/nuova_bentley_continental_gt_effetti_speciali_con_il_display_rotante/

https://www.breitling.com/it-it/news/details/breitling-and-bentley-driving-together-into-the-future-23898

How can luxury brands engage Gen Z? Chanel has a new idea

Nowadays Millennials are no longer the “favorite child” of luxury brands, because  Generation Z is becoming the spending force to be reckoned with. Mllennials and Generation Z represented around 30% of the luxury goods market in 2016, and they will grow over 40% by 2025 especially due to the financial maturity of today’s Gen Z’ers, according to a study by  Deloitte. 

So, how can luxury brands engage Millennials and expecially Gen Z consumers? Continue reading “How can luxury brands engage Gen Z? Chanel has a new idea”

E-commerce in China: Tmall’s luxury pavilion sets the pace

Unlike other luxury goods markets, e-commerce plays a huge role in China, given that the market size of cross-border retail e-commerce sales there is expected to exceed $140 billion by 2021 (according to eMarketer).

China already accounts for about one-third of global luxury goods sales, and its share is growing. In general – according to Bain & Co –  in 2017 sales of luxury goods hit 142 billion yuan and Chinese shoppers accounted for 32% of the 262 billion euro global luxury market.

And these figures are expected to increase: China’s share of global luxury spending is seen reaching 44% of the global market by 2025 (source: McKinsey).

(Source: LaPresse/AP)

Considering the profile of the average Chinese consumer, their enthusiasm for buying online is not actually surprising: they are young (age dropped from 35 to 25) and way more connected than their Western counterparts (China is the most connected country in the world!).

Moreover, Chinese consumers approach the online channel as if they were going to the mall with their friends: this is why the aim of Chinese e-tailers has always been to provide a rich alternative to traditional shopping.

Luxury brands have started to understand the importance of this channel and tried to enter this world full of new opportunities.

The clearest example yet of how Chinese luxury shoppers can flock to specially-tailored online experiences is Tmall, a B2C online retail site operating in China and owned by the Alibaba Group, with more than 550 millions of customers.

                   (Source: Journal du Luxe)

When asked who is their target client, the answer is clear: in between 26 and 30 years old, with a bachelor degree, married with children and pets.

The average annual expenditure of the Chinese consumer on Tmall is about 90,000 yuan (almost 15,000 euros ) per year. Their clients love shopping online and – especially –  Made in Italy luxury products.

Considering all these factors, in 2017 they decided to open their luxury pavilion: an exclusive space, invitation-only, where brands can sell directly to consumers and have full control over the experience. It is considered the most important platform online for millennials (44%) and today carries more than 80 brands including Valentino, Versace, Ermenegildo Zegna, Moncler, Moschino, Giuseppe Zanotti, and Maserati.

Last December, Tmall unveiled a new app with a sort of Maison store. The aim of this new format – as Lili Chen, general manager of Tmall luxury pavilion recently said in an interview – is to “let luxury brands digitally embody their unique brand stories, heritage, savoir-faire, and innovations, as well as their in-store atmosphere and energy. Moreover, it is a way to help them engage with online luxury consumers – mainly the ‘always connected’ generation – and provide them with the best tailored, immersive shopping experience close to the one that they would get by shopping in a brick-and-mortar store”.

This is the ultimate goal of the Chinese online giant. As Jack Ma – owner of Alibaba – once said: “We were able to sell online 100 Maserati and 100 Mercedes in 18 seconds. (…) The Canadian Prime Minister called me and asked me to help them sell their famous lobsters. In 5 hours we sold 96,000, and in Vancouver, they ran out of lobsters for three weeks, but Chinese people were thrilled.”

Now it’s up to brands to understand the magnitude of this channel and the possibilities connected to it.